Canning Potatoes ~ How to Pressure Can Potatoes at Home (2023)

Canning potatoes at home is an easy way to preserve potatoes for long term storage. Pre-cooked and ready to use, home-canned potatoes make for quick last-minute meals right from your homemade pantry.

Canning Potatoes ~ How to Pressure Can Potatoes at Home (1)

Why Can Potatoes?

While I’ll can just about anything at home, I’ll admit that canning potatoes weren’t high on my priority list. Our basement stays a consistent 50 degrees year-round, and though that’s on the warm side for a root cellar, we’ve had great success storing potatoes with minimal work. Most years we put away about 200 lbs of potatoes in the fall, and with two potato loving children in the house, that stockpile rarely makes it to the following June.

If they’re so easy to store, why bother canning potatoes? Plenty of reasons!

  • Canning potatoes ensures you have a steady supply of potatoes into the spring and summer. Many varieties of potatoes won’t keep that long, even in the best root storage conditions, and only the very best storage potato varieties will last until the following year’s crop comes in.
  • Canned potatoes are the ultimate homemade convenience food. They’re shelf-stable, nutritious and ready to heat and serve. Warm the pieces in their canning liquid on the stove, strain and top with butter, sour cream and/or chives and you’ve got a satisfying homemade dish in no time.
  • Small potatoes don’t store well in a root cellar, but they’re just the right size for canning. If you have a bumper crop of small spuds, it’s time to get canning!

Canning Potatoes ~ How to Pressure Can Potatoes at Home (2)

My daughter, holding a handful of small potatoes, which happen to be perfect for canning.

This year, our potato crop yielded a lot of undersized potatoes, and while we usually eat those quickly and save the larger tubers for storage…there were just too darn many! While I ended up canning potatoes out of sheer necessity, I’m actually happy I did. They’ve been a lifesaver on busy weeknights, and next year I’m going to can up a larger batch.

I’m thinking of canning potatoes in meat stock as well so that I’ll have an easy versatile soup base too. We already pressure can bone broth and a separate batch of extra yummy pork stock every year, adding potatoes into the mix for a case or two should be easy enough.

Potatoes, believe it or not, actually require more time in the pressure canner than meat stock, so the instructions for canning potatoes would be the same whether you’re canning them in water or meat stock.

Best Types of Potatoes for Canning

Whether you’re canning chopped potatoes or canning whole potatoes, you’ll want to choose a variety that can withstand the heat in a pressure canner without falling apart. Some varieties are bred to yield a starchy, light and fluffy baking potato, like russet. Similarly, others are great for mashed potatoes and fall apart easily during boiling. Avoid any variety of potato that falls apart during cooking and especially starchy varieties.

Choose firm-fleshed, waxy potatoes for canning. According to the National Center for Food Preservation’s blog,

“White potatoes for canning should be the “waxy” or “boiling” kind. Different types of potatoes have different amounts and types of starches and they react to heating differently. You want a potato that keeps its shape and texture well after a lot of heating, and not one that falls apart becomes “fluffy” after cooking, and is better for mashing. Most red-skin potatoes are of lower starch than baking potatoes and work well for canning. Many white round potatoes with thin skins fall into this category with red-skin potatoes too. Russets are not good for canning but are good for baking (they have a high starch content). Yukon Gold may not be the best potatoes for canning. While they seem good for boiling, they do tend to fall apart when overcooked. From what we have read, there is a wide variety in the types and amounts of starches in blue potatoes, so not all blues are the same, just like not all white potatoes are the same in these characteristics.”

(Video) HOMESTEAD PANTRY STOCK | Pressure Canning Potatoes

Beyond that, new potatoes harvested young and small tend to contain less starch than fully grown “adult” potatoes. If you’re planning on canning up large amounts, start harvesting early and you’ll limit the starch content of the potatoes and improve their canning quality.

Think about any potatoes you’d use to make a good, firm potato salad and you’ll be all set.

Can You Can Potatoes With the Skin On?

Skipping the peeling step would save a lot of prep time before actually canning potatoes, but canning potatoes with the skin on is not recommended for several reasons…

Primarily, safety. All the testing around canning times for potatoes was conducted using peeled potatoes. Botulism spores actually live in the soil in contact with potato skins, so leaving the skin on the potato might make a difference in the total canning time. According to the National Center for Home Food Preservation, potatoes should be peeled before canning because:

“That style of preparation is how the research was carried out to determine the recommended processing, and in order to know that the peeling does or does not make a difference, research would need to be done with unpeeled potatoes. Different assumptions might be needed in assessing just how many spores ofC. botulinum or other bacteria might be present at the start of the process and what amount of heat might be needed to meet standards for the risk of possible survivors. We do not know of research of canning potatoes with peels left on, so we recommend the preparation steps provided with the process recommendation, especially because there is a possibility that the deviation could result in a less safe situation.”

Reading that, it sounds like the NCFP is trying to cover all the bases, and is really being overly cautious here. Realistically, the skins likely don’t make that much difference assuming they’re well-scrubbed. Know that it’s just not a tested canning recipe, and you’ll have to use your own best judgment for your health here.

That said, beyond safety, peeling potatoes before canning is just a good idea. Canning potatoes involves high heat in a pressure canner, and those skins are likely just going to fall off in the jar anyway and make a big mess. When you’re dealing with homegrown potatoes, they’re also usually pretty dirt-covered and scrubbing off every last bit of schmutz would likely take just as long as peeling anyway.

So when you’re canning potatoes, you should be canning peeled potatoes…

Canning Potatoes ~ How to Pressure Can Potatoes at Home (3)

Can You Can Raw Potatoes?

Canning potatoes raw pack is actually not a tested canning method (sadly). I love raw packing whenever possible, assuming it won’t impact quality (as it does when you’re canning peaches), but when canning potatoes all the tested recipes being with hot pack or cooking the potatoes first.

Potatoes are dense, and it can take a substantial amount of time to heat a potato through to the center in a pressure canner. If you’re raw packing, it’s possible that you’re not holding the potatoes at a high enough temperature for a long enough time for safe canning.

Start by boiling the potatoes for 2 minutes for 1/2 inch to 1-inch cubes. For whole new potatoes about 2” in diameter, the recommendation is to parboil them 10 minutes. Pack the hot potatoes into canning jars, and cover with boiling water (don’t use the water you boiled the potatoes in for best quality, it’s full of starch).

How Long Will Canned Potatoes Last?

Commercially canned potatoes in tin cans are rated for 3-5 years, but generally, the advice for home canners is to consume home-canned potatoes within 12 to 18 months. Ball canning just introduced new canning lids that are guaranteed for 18 months, and that is the current recommendation when using the newer lids.

(Video) Pressure Canning Potatoes | How To Can Potatoes | Canned Potatoes

Practically speaking, canned potatoes last much longer. After about a year I’ve found that most pressure canned foods tend to lose quality, but slightly lower quality doesn’t mean it’s not safe to eat. Assuming the seal is unbroken and the potatoes were properly pressure canned, they should last quite a long time.

Canning Potatoes ~ How to Pressure Can Potatoes at Home (4)

Supplies for Canning Potatoes at Home

Canning potatoes require a pressure canner, there’s no way around it. Historically, there were recommendations for water bath canning potatoes, but the last time that was considered an acceptable practice was in the early 1950s. Back then, it was thought safe to water bath can potatoes with a 3 hour boil time, but that method has since been removed from canning recommendations due to safety concerns. For the last 70+ years, all canning recommendations for potatoes have involved pressure canning.

(Note: A pressure CANNER is not the same as a pressure COOKER, and you cannot use an instant pot or similar appliance for canning potatoes.)

To can pressure can potatoes, you will need:

  • Either a Dial gauge or Weighted gauge pressure canner (I use this one)
  • Jar Grabber (to pick up hot jars)
  • Canning Funnel (optional with potatoes, but recommended for a cleaner pack)
  • Large Slotted Spoon (for removing potatoes from blanching liquid, leaving the cooking liquid behind)
  • 2 Large Pots (one for pre-cooking the potatoes, the second for boiling water to pack the potatoes)
  • Cutting Board
  • Paring Knife and/or Potato Peeler

Is Salt Required for Canning Potatoes?

Strictly speaking, salt isn’t required to safely can potatoes. It’s perfectly fine to can potatoes without salt, but I don’t recommend it. Potatoes taste best with salt, and the salt helps them maintain good texture during the canning process. If you’d like to use less salt, go right ahead. The general recommendation is 1 tsp per quart jar, but feel free to reduce it based on your tastes.

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How to Can Potatoes

All in all, pressure canning potatoes is pretty simple, provided you’re familiar with the basics of pressure canning. I’ll make no assumptions though, and take you through the process of canning potatoes step by step, and if you’re a seasoned pressure canner go ahead and just read the recipe card below.

Start by placing two large pots of water on the stove and bringing them to a boil. One is to pre-cook the potatoes, and the other is fresh, clean water that will be used as canning liquid in the jars. Do not re-use cooking liquid from the potatoes for packing.

While the water is coming to a boil, prepare your potatoes. Peel the potatoes, and chop any large spuds into 1 to 2” pieces. Smaller potatoes under 2” in diameter can be left whole, but still must be peeled. Place the potatoes in water to prevent browning while you work. Some sources recommend adding lemon juice to the water, but really just so long as there submerged they won’t brown and lemon isn’t really necessary.

Once the water is boiling, place the potatoes into the water and pre-cook for 2 minutes (for 1” cubes) or 10 minutes (for whole potatoes about 2” in diameter). Strain the potatoes after cooking and discard the cooking liquid.

Pack the cooked potatoes into canning jars (pints or quarts, quarts recommended for efficiency), leaving 1” headspace. Cover with clean, boiling water (maintaining 1” headspace) and add 1 tsp canning salt per quart (optional). Wipe rims and apply 2 part canning lids, tightening to just finger tight.

Place your pressure canner on the stove and add about 2” of boiling water to the bottom from the clean boiling water pot. Insert the canning rack that came with the canner, and then load in the hot jars into the pressure canner.

(Video) How to Pressure Can Potatoes

Close the pressure canner and allow the steam to vent for 10 minutes before fully sealing with a canning weight.

Allow the pressure canner to come up to pressure, and begin timing once the required pressure is shown on the gauge. When canning potatoes under 1000 feet in elevation, set the pressure canner to 10 pounds pressure and process for 35 minutes (pints) or 40 minutes (quarts). For other altitudes and when using a dial gauge pressure canner, see the table below for the appropriate times/pressures for canning potatoes:

Canning Potatoes ~ How to Pressure Can Potatoes at Home (6)

Canning Potatoes ~ How to Pressure Can Potatoes at Home (7)

Yield: Yield Varies, see note

Prep Time: 1 hour

Cook Time: 40 minutes

Additional Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 2 hours

Canning potatoes in a pressure canner is a simple way to preserve potatoes at home for long term storage. Home-canned potatoes will keep for years at room temperature, without the electricity required for a freezer.

(Video) Canning Potatoes | Dry Pack Method

Ingredients

  • Potatoes (see notes for quantity)
  • Canning Salt (optional ~ 1 tsp per quart, see note)

Instructions

  1. Place two large pots of water on the stove and bring them to a boil. One is to pre-cook the potatoes, and the other is fresh, clean water that will be used as canning liquid in the jars. Important: Do not re-use cooking liquid from the potatoes for packing.
  2. While the water is coming to a boil, prepare your potatoes. Peel the potatoes, and chop any large spuds into 1 to 2'' pieces. Smaller potatoes under 2'' in diameter can be left whole, but still must be peeled. Place the potatoes in a bowl of water and keep them submerged to prevent browning while you work.
  3. Once the water is boiling, place the potatoes into the water and pre-cook for 2 minutes (for 1'' cubes) or 10 minutes (for whole potatoes about 2'' in diameter). Strain the potatoes after cooking and discard the cooking liquid.
  4. Pack the cooked potatoes into canning jars (pints or quarts, quarts recommended for efficiency). Leave 1'' headspace.
  5. Cover with clean, boiling water and add 1 tsp salt per quart (optional).
  6. Wipe rims and apply 2 part canning lids, tightening to just finger tight.
  7. Place your pressure canner on the stove and add about 2'' of boiling water to the bottom from the clean boiling water pot. Insert the canning rack that came with the canner, and then load in the hot jars into the pressure canner.
  8. Close the pressure canner and allow the steam to vent for 10 minutes before fully sealing with a canning weight.
  9. Allow the pressure canner to come up to pressure, and begin timing once the required pressure is shown on the gauge. When canning potatoes under 1000 feet in elevation, set the pressure canner to 10 pounds pressure and process for 35 minutes (pints) or 40 minutes (quarts). For other altitudes and when using a dial gauge pressure canner, see the table above for the appropriate times/pressures for canning potatoes.

Notes

The yield will vary based on the size of your potatoes and how efficient you are with peeling, as well as how efficient you are at packing the jars. Potatoes in a small dice mean more pounds per jar, while whole 2'' potatoes mean less pounds per jar. For diced potatoes, it takes just under 3 pounds to fill a quart jar, and for small whole potatoes, it's more like 2 pounds per jar.

My 30 quart All American pressure canner holds 14 quarts, while many smaller models hold 7. Adjust the total quantity of potatoes to your batch size and cutting methods. If you'd like to check ahead of time, pack the jars with raw potatoes to measure, knowing that they'll shrink a bit in the blanching, so be sure to have a bit extra too.

Do not use iodized table salt for canning, it contains other anti-caking agents. Only use canning salt or kosher salt. The salt is optional in this recipe, and not necessary for preservation. It is recommended for flavor, and maintaining the texture of the potatoes during canning.

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Pressure Canning Recipes

Looking for more simple pressure canning recipes? Here are a few to keep you preserving…

  • Canning Green Beans
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Canning Potatoes ~ How to Pressure Can Potatoes at Home (10)

Related

FAQs

Can potatoes be pressure canned? ›

The only tested, safe method to can potatoes is to pressure can them. Potatoes are a low acid vegetable and like all low acid foods they must be pressure canned. This is very easy to do but you need a specific Pressure canning pot.

How long to pressure can potatoes? ›

Process the Potatoes

The potatoes need to be processed in a weighted pressure canner at 10 pounds pressure for 35 minutes for pint jars and 40 minutes of quart jars if you live at an altitude of 1,000 feet above sea level or less (Image 3).

HOW DO YOU CAN potatoes at home? ›

For whole potatoes, boil 10 minutes and drain. Add 1 teaspoon of salt per quart to the jar, if desired. Fill jars with hot prepared potatoes, leaving no more than 1-inch headspace. Cover hot potatoes with FRESH boiling water, leaving 1-inch headspace and covering all pieces of potato.

Can you pressure can unpeeled potatoes? ›

You will need to peel your potatoes before canning. There are no safe tested recipes for canning potatoes with the skins on. Removing the skins by peeling potatoes reduces the amount of bacteria on the potato.

How do you pressure can whole potatoes? ›

How to Pressure Can Potatoes
  1. Prep jars like you would for water bath canning.
  2. Boil a pot of water and peel and cut potatoes.
  3. Fill jars with potatoes and pour boiling water on top. Leave a 1" headspace.
  4. Place jars in pressure canner and follow canning instructions to bring canner to 10lbs pressure.
3 Jun 2022

Why did my pressure canned potatoes turn brown? ›

In general, oxidation may cause foods to darken at the tops of jars. Oxidation is from air in the jars or too little heating or processing to destroy enzymes. Overprocessing may cause discolored foods throughout the containers.

How much water do you put in a pressure canner when canning potatoes? ›

Add 3 quarts of water to your pressure canner and put it on a burner set to high. Make sure there is a canning rack in the bottom of the canner. Add the potatoes to the jars. (optional) Add 1/2 tsp canning salt to each pint or 1 tsp to each quart.

Can russet potatoes be pressure canned? ›

Russets are not good for canning but are good for baking (they have a high starch content). Yukon Gold may not be the best potatoes for canning. While they seem good for boiling, they do tend to fall apart when overcooked.

How long to pressure can dry packed potatoes? ›

Process at 10 psi for weighted gauge, or 11 psi for dial gauge, or according to your elevation. Process quarts for 40 minutes and pints for 35 minutes.

How long will canned potatoes last? ›

Shelf Life Tips

Properly stored, an unopened can of potatoes will generally stay at best quality for about 3 to 5 years, although it will usually remain safe to use after that.

Is dry canning potatoes safe? ›

Both the National Center for Home Food Preservation "Dry canning raw vegetable is an unsafe practice," and Dr. Barbara Ingham's "Unsafe canning practice: 'dry canning' vegetables" articles outline the following reasons why this is extremely dangerous because of the potential for botulism poisoning.

Why did my canned potatoes turn cloudy? ›

There are other factors like soaking while you cubed them or making sure to follow the correct timing for processing them in a pressure canner. An over-processed potato no matter the variety will make the liquid they are canned in look cloudy.

Do you have to blanch potatoes before pressure canning? ›

If you're raw packing, it's possible that you're not holding the potatoes at a high enough temperature for a long enough time for safe canning. Start by boiling the potatoes for 2 minutes for 1/2 inch to 1-inch cubes. For whole new potatoes about 2” in diameter, the recommendation is to parboil them 10 minutes.

Do potatoes have to be peeled to can? ›

To peel or not to peel, it's your choice. The most time-consuming part here is cleaning the potatoes and waiting for the canner to get up to pressure and then cool down. The yield will vary according to the amount of potatoes and whether or not you quarter them or put them in whole.

Do you have to use ascorbic acid when canning potatoes? ›

Tubers stored below 45ºF may discolor when canned. Treat with ascorbic acid to prevent surface darkening (3000 mg or 1 teaspoon to 1 gallon of water). Potatoes need to be firm enough that they do not become mushy when placed into the jars.

What should not be pressure canned? ›

Foods that cannot be pressure canned include milk, cream, dairy products, coconut milk, flour, corn starch, rice, pasta, starchy foods, and eggs. We will help you know what foods can and should be pressure canned by providing a long list of foods and links to recipes below.

Can you pressure can potatoes and onions together? ›

Yes, you may can potatoes and onions together. I raw pack potatoes and chunks of onions, add a teaspoonful of salt to the jar, then pour boiling water to cover the vegetables to within half an inch of the top of the jar. If you pre-cook the potatoes, they will get mushy on processing.

How do you preserve fresh potatoes? ›

Potatoes need airflow to prevent the accumulation of moisture, which can lead to spoilage. The best way to allow free circulation of air is to store them in an open bowl or paper bag. Do not store them in a sealed container without ventilation, such as a zipped plastic bag or lidded glassware.

How do I know if I pressure canned correctly? ›

Method 1: The Press. A properly sealed jar lid will not spring up when you press down in the center. Use a finger to press down on the middle of the lid. Sealed: There is no give when you press down in the center.

How do you know if you canned correctly? ›

If the jar is sealed correctly, it will make a ringing, high-pitched sound. Hold the jar at eye level and look across the lid. The lid should be concave (curved down slightly in the center). If center of the lid is flat or bulging, it may not be sealed.

What happens if pressure is too high when canning? ›

It is okay to keep our canner 2 or 3 PSI higher than the required temperature, but do not let the pressure exceed 4 PSI above what is required or the jars may result in liquid loss from syphoning once you bring the temperature back down to correct the increase. Know your altitude.

Can you put too much water in a pressure cooker when canning? ›

Never fill your pressure canner with more than two inches of water from the bottom, no matter how many jars you're canning. What is this? This differs from water bath canning which requires jars to be submerged.

How many cups of water do you put in a pressure canner? ›

When you use a pressure cooker, you need to have enough liquid in the pot for it to come up to pressure and cook the food properly. The rule of liquids in pressure cooking is to always add at least 1 cup of liquid unless the recipe states otherwise. The liquid will help create enough steam to cook the meal. 3.

Why is dry canning potatoes not approved? ›

"Dry Canning" Not Recommended.

Canning vegetables or any food pieces without the covering liquid that was used in process research can result in under-processing and in the case of vegetables, a risk of botulism.

Are red potatoes good for pressure canning? ›

Red potatoes must be pressure canned using the USDA's process for canning any potato; there is no other way to can them. But if you have a pressure canner, these are pure gold to have on hand, especially in the summer for last-minute potato salads.

Do you need to soak potatoes before canning? ›

Once all the potatoes are peeled, wash them and soak in cold water to be ready for canning. The cold water will prevent them from discoloring and also remove some of the starch. You can let them soak for a few hours or overnight.

What is the longest you can store potatoes? ›

Potatoes can last for up to several months in a cool pantry. If stored at room temperature, they are best if eaten within one to two weeks. Once cooked, keep them in the fridge for no more than three days.

Which home canned foods last longest? ›

Several factors affect the shelf life of canned foods, but the general rule is that highly acidic foods (pickles, juices, tomatoes, and all kinds of fruits) expire sooner than low-acid canned items (canned poultry, stews, pasta and meat, etc.) that can last a lot longer.

How do you store potatoes long term? ›

Store Potatoes In a Cool, Dry Place

Potatoes are best kept around 45˚F to 50˚F, which means they shouldn't be stored in the fridge or freezer. The best place to store them for maximum shelf life (up to three months!) is a cool basement or garage—as long as it's dry.

What should not be home canned? ›

Low-acid foods are the most common sources of botulism linked to home canning. These foods have a pH level greater than 4.6. Low-acid foods include most vegetables (including asparagus, green beans, beets, corn, and potatoes), some fruits (including some tomatoes and figs), milk, all meats, fish, and other seafood.

Can botulism survive pressure canning? ›

If proper temperatures to destroy the spores are not reached, they have a suitable environment to convert into growing cells and produce the deadly toxin. Scientifically proven pressure canning processes are designed to destroy C. botulinum spores.

When should you start pressure canning? ›

The canner will pressurize during the next 3 to 10 minutes. Start timing the process when the pressure reading on the dial gauge indicates that the recommended pressure has been reached, or, for canners without dial gauges, when the weighted gauge begins to jiggle or rock as the manufacturer describes.

What kind of potatoes are best for canning? ›

Most red-skin potatoes are of lower starch than baking potatoes and work well for canning. Many white round potatoes with thin skins fall into this category with red-skin potatoes too. Russets are not good for canning but are good for baking (they have a high starch content).

Are canned potatoes cooked or raw? ›

Yes, canned potatoes are fully cooked. Canned whole potatoes are peeled new potatoes. If they used bigger potatoes, only one or two would fit in the can! Because canned potatoes are cooked, you can eat them straight from the can.

Can you vacuum seal raw unpeeled potatoes? ›

The answer is yes, but potatoes are a fickle bunch when it comes to storage. Trying to vacuum seal and freeze a raw potato whole simply won't work. So, you'll have to prepare your potatoes for storage.

What happens if you don't poke a hole in a potato? ›

"It pokes holes in the skin, which allows steam to escape. Otherwise, they could explode—it doesn't happen all the time, but it happens every once in a while. The potato is full of water it's trying to turn to steam, or water vapor.

Can you raw pack potatoes for canning? ›

Although canning some vegetable raw (otherwise known as raw pack) is fine, you cannot can potatoes raw pack. They are always canned hot pack. In other words, they need to be par cooked first. Cook whole 1-2″ potatoes about 10 minutes and diced potatoes about 2 minutes.

How long should potatoes cure before canning? ›

To cure the potatoes, lay them out in a cool, dry, and dark place. Keep temperatures between 50 and 60 degrees, and let the potatoes rest for about two weeks. This curing process will make the skins tougher, which helps the potatoes keep longer.

Can I use lemon juice for canning potatoes? ›

Cut the potatoes into cubes about 1 1/2 to 2 inches in size. As your cutting them up put them in a bowl filled with water and about a cup of lemon juice. This is to keep the potatoes from turning brown.

How long do you pressure can quart jars of potatoes? ›

Under normal conditions, potatoes need to be pressure canned at 11 pounds of pressure for 35 minutes for pints and 40 minutes for quarts.

Can you pressure can potatoes and carrots together? ›

I like to can taters and carrots together in quart jars. This makes it easy to throw together a stew at a moment's notice by adding eithe...

How do the Amish can food? ›

The process of canning hasn't changed much over the decades, though Amish women today may use a propane-powered or generator-powered stove, depending on what their particular Community and Bishop allows. Martha uses a propane-powered stove to heat water to sterilize her jars and for the canning process.

Can you leave too much headspace when canning? ›

If too much headspace is allowed, the food at the top is likely to discolor. Also, the jar may not seal properly because there will not be enough processing time to drive all the air out of the jar.

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